Interview with Mike Daly Part I: Andy Ibanez and Dillon Tate

Last weekend, I had the chance to sit down with Mike Daly, the Texas Rangers Senior Director of Minor League Operations and get an overview of the current roster of the Hickory Crawdads. The interview turned lengthy with a bunch of good information.

I decided to break the interview up rather than put the entire interview into one blog entry and have the reader’s eyes glaze over.

Fully one-third of the interview was spent on arguably the two most highly watched players on the Crawdads squad: second baseman Andy Ibanez and starting pitcher Dillon Tate. Below is that portion of the interview.

 

The first thing that I get questions about when people ask me about the team is Andy Ibanez. He’s the first person that people ask me about. I think that’s cooled off a little bit, as he’s cooled off in May. But the question that people ask most is, “Why isn’t he at Frisco?” My response has been, “he’s where he needs to be because he needs to work on things.” Where is that progression as far as what the Rangers were asking him to do?

Daly: I think, first and foremost, is the really job by our international scouting department. Gil Kim was our international director, who’s now at Toronto. He was a guy that was really on Andy in the scouting process and he did a really nice job of scouting him and working with other scouts to be able to bring him into the organization.

Andy’s is a little bit of a unique situation. He had not played baseball in a number of years. Trying to bring him into a new country having not playing baseball for a couple of seasons, we felt like it was best to start him here in Hickory. We felt really good about putting him down here in this environment. We felt really good with Francisco Matos, a bi-lingual hitting coach with experience up and down the minor league level, a guy who was in the major leagues himself. We felt really good being able to start Andy here in Hickory kind of not knowing what to expect, since it’s been a number of years since he had played. But Andy’s been great. We’re really happy with where he’s at. He’s working hard defensively to really tighten up some things at second base from a defensive standpoint.

I think we’re in a good spot organizationally with Travis Demeritte, who was a former first round pick and a former Crawdad, who’s really taken a nice step this year, leading the California League in home runs, and he’s playing second base on an everyday basis. And then another young man, Evan Van Hoosier, he was in the Arizona Fall League, he’s now in AA playing second base on an everyday basis, another former Crawdad. So, we’re pretty strong with second basemen up and down the system right now. We feel really good with Andy getting his at-bats and getting acclimated to baseball here in the states and being with a really good hitting coach in Francisco Matos. Andy’s time to move will come. We just feel like right now the best spot for him to be to work offensively and defensively is here in Hickory, N.C.

 

Was part of the process was to see how he would deal with failure at this level and not have the pressure of, he’s got to be at AA and have the results at that level that maybe you’re not worried as much about here at this level?

Daly: Absolutely, and I think that’s a great point. You definitely want to see how a guy adjusts, how he’s able to go through adversity, how he’s able to deal with failure. I think the other thing that we’ve learned, too, is maybe there’s little bit of a lean toward holding them back if they’re having success can be a good thing at the lowest levels and really get that foundation built, understand the adversity, understand what it’s like to be in the Texas Rangers organization, understand what it’s like to play a full season. Once we feel good that a player has established himself and has an understanding of what it’s like to go through a full-season adversity, then we’ll take the training wheels off, if you will, then we’ll be a little bit more aggressive in terms of promoting the guy once we feel that he’s mastered a level.

 

So there was no – when (Ibanez) was leading the world in everything in April – sense of hitting the accelerator?

Daly: No, we had some of those discussions. Obviously, he was outstanding there in April, but it’s a five-month season here at the minor league level and it’s a grind each and every day. Andy will definitely have his time at the higher level and it’ll probably come sooner rather than later. I think for the foreseeable future, right now he’ll be right here in Hickory and really  getting that first year under his belt.

 

Dillon Tate started well, then had the hamstring injury and then hit some bumps in the road, maybe a little bit unexpectedly given his pedigree and the level. Give me your feedback on what you’re seeing with Dillon.

Daly: It’s been a little tough for Dillon since he’s signed. He’s had a couple times that he’s had to go on the DL and I figure that’s held back some of his time on the mound. I think that Dillon continues to build a very strong routine. There’s a lot that goes into being a starting pitcher, both on the field and off the field: throwing program, weight program, conditioning program. I think what we’ve seen over the past couple of starts is that Dillon’s had the ability now and he’s kind of gotten past all those injuries to be able to get on the mound and to go deep in games.

I saw the game here the other night. The first inning was a struggle, but in his last batter he made a really good pitch on a 3-1 count and got a double play ball. From that point forward, he was able to help his team and was able to get five innings. You saw the development of the slider and of the changeup. He’s getting more confident throwing all of his pitches.

It’s something where, I know Dillon’s frustrated with some of those injuries and it’s something where it seems he’s able to get past and is able to spend more time on the mound and working on his craft as a pitcher.

 

On a development level with somebody like Dillon, maybe with all of the guys, but somebody like Dillon, who’s had success at the college level and has come here, are you more interested in seeing them do well, or to see how they rebound from having a struggle?

Daly: I think that you’re looking at all those aspects. The college game is very different from the pro game and very different from the major league level. There was a reason that Dillon Tate was a fourth overall selection. He’s a very talented young man who had a lot of success there at Cal-Santa Barbara. So, when we brought him into the organization, we wanted to see what type of pitcher he was, how he threw, where he had his success before we started talking to him about making some of those adjustments.

Like I said, I think some of the injuries have held him back just a little bit, but we’re excited that he seems to be past those, even facing some of those injuries that are a part of the adversity that any pitcher has to go through in their career. Obviously, Dillon has dealt with it early on in his career.

You obviously want your pitchers or position players to have a lot of success, but you’re obviously about adding to their repertoire, adding certain weapons – the ability to hold runners, the ability to throw offspeed pitches behind in the count, the ability to make your start every five days. Those are the things that we’re working on with Dillon, understanding that it’s a long process. He’s going to A ball to high-A to AA to AAA. It’s a process. It’s a ladder to make it to the major league level. Dillon’s going through some things now that I think will be a really good foundation for him to go through and learn as he continues in his career.

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