Wildcat on a Mission: An Interview with Kyle Cody

The Texas Rangers over the past several years have had good luck with drafting mid-round college level pitchers that have midwestern roots and seeing them develop into major league talent. Nick Tepesch (14th round from Missouri), Jerad Eickhoff (15th round Olney Central College) are a couple that come to mind. Connor Sadzeck (11th round Howard College) is another that’s on the doorstep currently at AA Frisco (Tex.). They’re like pre-packaged foods, in a sense: 6-foot-6ish 240 pounds with mid-90s fastballs, well-developed breaking balls and fledgling changeups. Just add seasoning and they’re ready to pitch.

At 6-7, 245 pounds with three pitches in hand Kyle Cody may be the soon on line at the major league buffet.

The Chippewa Falls, Wisc. native was the sixth-round pick of the Rangers in 2016 out of Kentucky. The Gatorade player of the year in Wisconsin his senior season pitched four seasons for the Wildcats, spurning the chance to turn pro out of high school with the Philadelphia Phillies (33rd round) in 2012 and with the Minnesota Twins (73rd pick overall) in 2015. Cody, 22, comes with a fastball that tops 96 mph, slider and a changeup that he admits is a work in progress. He’s been a constant force in the rotation as of late. A one-hit, eight-strikeout, eight-inning affair at Lakewood (NJ) on June 17 earned him South Atlantic League pitcher of the week honors. Two starts later on July 3, he gave up one unearned run on one hit and fanned 10 at West Virginia. The SAL is hitting .132 against him so far in the second half with 19 Ks in 11 innings.

In talking with Cody for this interview, there is that quiet, midwestern manner that has an unmistakable, matter-of-fact confidence. He’s faced some of the SEC’s best over the past four years with the Wildcats and there is a sense, as he has seen those former foes attain major league dreams, that Cody feels he belongs with that group and soon.  Yet, for now, he knows there is work to be done in gaining consistency, not only from game-to-game, but pitch-to-pitch.

In the interview below, Cody talked about his progression this season, some of his experiences with the SEC that has gotten him to the point, as well as his current dream matchup in the majors.

Kyle Cody - lin 2

Crawdads RHP Kyle Cody from a game on May 16 vs. Greensboro when he fanned 10. (Crystal Lin/ Hickory Crawdads)

 

First question I have for you is what was it like pitching for Lexington? I know you went to UK (Kentucky) and unfortunately had a rain-shortened deal.

Cody: It was pretty cool to go back and get to see some friends back at school. It wasn’t like how it usually was, where you get the college atmosphere. There was no one there pretty much because school was out, but it was still nice to see some familiar faces and just to get back in that area. I love that place. It’s a beautiful area. It was cool to get back to some of the restaurants there and stuff. It was pretty fun.

 

How many tickets did you leave?

Cody: When I started, I think I left 15 tickets. It kind of sucked that I only got to pitch two innings. Because everyone left, because of the rain,  I didn’t really get to see anyone, but, it is what it is and things happen.

 

Did the folks with the Legends give you any recognition or did they just let it slide?

Cody: When I was on the mound the first time they played the fight song when I pitched, but nothing unusual. They said that I had pitched at University of Kentucky and a few of the fans clapped, so that’s about it.

 

You pitched at a high school in Wisconsin, so how did you wind up going to Kentucky?

Cody: I was offered by Minnesota, Ohio State and Kentucky. It was just I left like it was the best offer. They really took me in there and it felt like home. It just felt like I had a good connection with all the coaches and I felt like it was the best decision for me.

 

What was it like to pitch in the SEC?

Cody:  It was pretty cool. At first, it was kind of a tough adjustment coming from a small high school where I was pitching in front of 15 or 20 people, all the way to 12,000 the next year. So, it was kind of tough at first, but it was quite an experience to play there and you get used to it and get better.

Kyle Cody - Lin

Kyle Cody from an April 13 appearance vs. Kannapolis (Crystal Lin)

 

What was the biggest adjustment as far as going to college from high school? Obviously, the competition was different, but as far as pitching wise, what did you have to do?

Cody: Locating my fastball on both sides of the plate. In high school, I just kind of threw it by everyone. That was the big thing was command of the fastball and then having a second pitch, and getting better with that, and then developing a changeup, which I’m still trying to do now and still trying to get better with that. In college, you’ve got to try and show one (changeup) for a strike and then now, you’ve got to get outs with it.

 

What was your second pitch in college?

Cody: Slider

 

Are you still developing that or are you pretty comfortable with that?

Cody: I’m pretty comfortable with my slider, now. It’s gotten a lot better the past year or so, I’d say. It’s little more sharp and has a little more velocity than it used to. So, I’m pretty happy with where that’s at right now.

Kyle Cody Tag play - Lin

Kyle Cody on a tag play at third during a home game vs. Lexington (KY.) (Crystal Lin)

 

Let me stay on the adjustment thread. Coming to pro ball, what were some adjustments you had to make?

Cody: From college, I worked a lot on my stride length and getting that a little bit longer. At college, it wasn’t very long and then last year in Spokane. And now, I’ve been working on that so I can get a little more extension with my pitches and get a little bit closer to the plate. So, that’s one thing I worked on. Also, just messing around with the changeup and trying to find a comfortable grip and get some velocity off of that pitch.

 

You had some games where you had some double-digit strikeout totals and then some where you didn’t, but you’re getting outs. Are you more comfortable as a strikeout pitcher or getting your groundballs and letting your defense work?

Cody: I don’t really have what I would prefer. I would say I just get outs anyway I can. The name of the game is to get outs any way possible. If one day it’s strikeouts and the next day it’s groundballs, I’ll take it. It doesn’t matter to me. If my pitches are working and I’m striking people out, I’m happy with that. If my fastball is working that day and I’m getting groundballs, then I’m happy with that, too.

 

Do you have a sense early if something is working that this is going to be a good day, versus, maybe it’s going to be a little tougher today?

Cody: Yeah, there’s been a few games already where I don’t really have command of my fastball early and then I have to work off my slider and get a few swings, and my changeup. There’s other times where I won’t have my offspeed pitches and I’ll have to just pound the fastball in and out. Those are days you have to battle just to try and get groundball outs and try to keep yourself in the game to save the bullpen.

 

What was the first reality check in pro ball when you realized that this is a whole different level?

Cody: I think it was my second outing. I came out of the bullpen and I just got roughed around a little bit. I think we were playing Everett and they had their first-rounder on the team – I think his name was Kyle Lewis. He hit a ball pretty hard off of me into the gap. I kind of feel like that was the moment where I was like, “Okay, it’s for real now. I’m ready to go. Let’s go.”

 

Was there a moment – and maybe it was that one – where a guy hit what you thought was a good pitch?:

Cody: Oh yeah, that happens a lot. You think you make a pitch and all of a sudden it’s in the gap or over the fence. So, that’s just something where you tip your cap and say, “they hit my pitch where I wanted it to be located.” You’ve just got to live with.

 

Talk to me about mental adjustments. Everyone I talk to says that when they get to the pro level there it’s much more of a mental game than a physical game. Have you found that to be true to this point?

Cody: In college, my coach preached that about the mental aspects of baseball. He always talked about being positive with yourself when on the mound and telling yourself where you’re going to make the pitch, where the pitch is going and stuff like that and keeping it simple. Right now, I feel like I’m doing a pretty good job of just keeping it simple and just focusing on executing pitches when I’m on the mound. That’s all I’m going to focus on right now is where the next pitch is going to be.

 

Is this more of a mental game than you thought it would be at this level?

Cody: Oh yeah, definitely.

 

How so?

Cody: (laughing) I mean, I feel like the whole thing is mental until you just execute a pitch. Off the field, you’ve got to talk to yourself a certain way and do the same stuff every day and just having a routine and going about your business. I feel like the mental side is what keeps you going, too, and what drives you in baseball.

 

How much did SEC play prepare you for the pro level?

Cody: I’d like to say quite a bit. You see all of the talent that comes out of the SEC and just all the pro players that are already in the big leagues and guys that I’ve faced already that are from the SEC. I’d like to say that it helped me to get where I’m at now. I’ve just got to keep working and hopefully move on and keep moving up.

 

Have you faced a guy in the pros that you faced in college where you’ve nodded and said, This is pretty cool; we’re both here.”?

Cody: I faced Dansby Swanson (Vanderbilt) in college. I faced Alex Bregman (LSU) in college. My teammate A.J. Reed, he went to the bigs, but he’s in AAA right now. Just guys like that, you kind of look back and you’re like, “Wow, two years ago I was pitching against him in college. Now he’s in the big leagues getting paid.” It’s kind of a reality check when you think about that for a second. Like, they’re already there and you’re still working to get there yourself. It kind of makes you work harder.

 

What’s the thing you’re most proud of as far as your progression this year?

Cody: I’d say, one thing I’ve been lacking in the past is consistency. As the season’s gone on, I’ve gotten more consistent with each start. I used to be up-and-down a little bit, a good start here and then a bad start and then a good start. Now I’m getting into a trend where I’m getting five or six innings almost every start. So, I’d say that’s the thing I’m most happy with now.

 

What’s the thing you’re working on next?

Cody: Limiting the walks. I’ve heard that if you want to move up, you’ve got to be able to throw the ball over the plate and not walk as many people. I think I lead the team in walks right now, so I want to cut some of those out.

 

You get a call to the major leagues, what is that like for you, do you think?

Cody: I feel like that will be a dream come true. Hopefully it’s not that long away, but it could be two or three years away. If that time comes, I’ll just be ecstatic to share that with my family and friends and just be very fortunate to be able to do that.

 

Is there a mentor that’s helped you along?

Cody: My parents have honestly gotten me so far and helped me be the person like I am today. They’ve helped me with anything and everything off the field. I can go to them about anything, so it’s something I’m very fortunate to have.

 

Who’s the big leaguer you’re looking forward to facing? Whether he gets a bomb off you or not, who do you want to face?

Cody: I want to face Bryce Harper, just because there’s a lot of hype there. I feel like he carries himself into the batter’s box like he’s going to hit a home run every time. I just want to look at him and be like, “I’m here, too.” I feel like that would be fun at bat.

 

Kyle Cody mug

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