Results tagged ‘ Adam Parks ’

Crawdads Strikeout History

(The following story is based on records I have at my disposal since 2005, as well as sporadic records kept by the Crawdads prior to that season. If others have further information, I welcome their inclusion here and will update.)

At Thursday’s home-opener win over Kannapolis, the Hickory Crawdads tied a club record for strikeouts in a nine-inning game. The trio of Jake Latz (8), Tai Tiedemann (5) and Nick Snyder (4) struck out 17 hitters during a 4-1 win.

With that game in mind, I thought Crawdads fans might want a look back at some of the other big strikeout games in the team’s history.

Hickory first registered 17 Ks in a nine-inning game back on May 25, 2009 in a game at Hagerstown, Md, when a pair of future major leaguers turned the trick. Right-hander Jake Brigham twirled the first five innings of shutout baseball, striking out eight and allowing three hits. Martin Perez then came in and upstaged him. The 18-year-old left-hander, then one of the pitching prospects in the minors, struck out nine over four innings and finished off a seven-hit shutout in a 6-0 win.

The individual pitcher with the most strikeouts in a single game was right-hander Jason Lakman, who on July 31, 1997 struck out 16. During that contest, he became one of the few pitchers in baseball history to struck out five in one inning when he turned the trick in the fifth.

The all-time single-game record for the team in a came back in August 2000 as part of a game that set the South Atlantic League record for most combined strikeouts in a game. Asheville and Hickory played 20 innings that day and rang up 53 strikeouts. In what was a loss, the Crawdads pitchers set 23 down on strikes. Unfortunately, the Hickory hitters set the league’s record for most whiffs in a game when they fanned 30 times.

The Crawdads got close to catching that mark a couple of times. During a 17-inning affair on May 9, 2015, Brett Martin (4), Trey Lambert (2), Adam Parks (7), David Perez (6) and Kelvin Vasquez (3) combined to strikeout 22 against Savannah. Their chance to catch and break the club mark ended on Crawdads walk-off homer by Jose Cardona.

The Crawdads has two other extra-inning games during which they struck out 20 or more batters. In a home game on May 4, 2010 against Asheville. Two future major league pitchers were among a quartet of Crawdads hurlers that fanned 20 during a 13-inning game. Starter Joe Wieland (8) and closer Josh Lueke (5), both of whom would go onto the big leagues, collected 13 with Braden Tullis (5) and Hector Nelo (2) filling in for seven others.

The other 20+ strikeout contest came during a loss in 19 innings to Rome (Ga.) on May 15, 2016. Peter Fairbanks had a pedestrian four over six innings with Blake Bass added two more in the seventh and eighth. Reliever and future big leaguer Jeffrey Springs had five over three innings before Omarlin Lopez dominated the Braves with eight in five innings. Sitting at 19 after 16 innings, the club record was in reach. Matt Ball tallied just one more in the 17th and 18th innings. With the Crawdads out of fresh arms, position player Dylan Moore threw in the 19th and was not able to register a K.

Crawdads Mid-Season Assessment: An Interview with Rangers VP Mike Daly

The Hickory Crawdads currently has the best record in the South Atlantic League at 50-29 (through July 5). While the Crawdads cruised to the first-half Northern Division title – clinching a playoff berth in September – the name of the game is first and foremost player development. In that aspect, the Texas Rangers have much to celebrate with the Crawdads roster, especially where the pitching staff is concerned.

Mike Daly, the Senior Vice President for Scouting and Player Development of the Texas Rangers, was in town during the recent weeklong homestand to get an extended look at the Crawdads in action.

The following is an interview I did with Daly during which he talked about some of the top pitchers on the staff – and assigning them to High Desert – a few of the top hitters, as well as the on-going struggles with Jairo Beras.

In the first half of the season the Crawdads were the best team in the South Atlantic League by record, and a lot of days, the best team on the field. The Rangers brass had to be excited with how the team played in the first half.

Mike Daly: Yeah, we’re certainly proud of the players and the staff. I think it starts with Corey Ragsdale, an outstanding manager who’s closing in on the all-time record for number of wins here – not only for the number of wins in Hickory – but with what he’s done taking on a really young group of players and bringing them together.

Each of the players get better individually but also as a collective group. They’re playing for each other, pulling for each other and ultimately winning a bunch of games. We’re very pleased and very proud of the group here in Hickory.

You mentioned the staff and Rags is here for the third year and seems a lot more comfortable with himself. You see the growth from him over the three years. It’s obvious that he’s in charge and the guys like playing for him, to a man.

Daly: Absolutely. Corey does a number of things very well. First, he has outstanding baseball knowledge. He knows the ins and outs of a baseball game. He has a very keen eye for what players need to do and how they need to develop on the field.

But then off the field, he has presence and he knows how to handle the clubhouse and the players. They respect him and enjoy playing for him, but otherwise they know who is in charge. We’re thrilled to have Corey in the organization and we’re very, very happy with what he’s done with the club so far in 2015.

As far as the first half the pitching staff, almost night in and night out, is getting five, six, seven innings in every night and then turns it over to a what’s been a pretty good bullpen for the most part.

Daly: I think that was reflected there in the all-star game with how many selections we had off our pitching staff. I think what’s really good is these guys push one another. So, when Ariel Jurado goes out and has a good outing, now Brett Martin wants to go out there and top him. Then Luis Ortiz, he wants to go out there and do better and Yohander Mendez wants to show where he’s at. Nick Gardewine wants to do that and Collin Wiles wants to do it better.

So it’s a real good internal competition amongst these guys each and every night. It certainly gives our ballclub an opportunity to win and it always starts with the starting pitching. These guys have really stepped up. It’s really, really fun to watch these guys compete against one another.

Jurado was not somebody that people read a lot about before this season. He took the ball the first night and for the most part at every start he toes the rubber and goes seven innings.

Daly: He’s been outstanding. He was one of the six starters that we wanted to send out here. That’s a big credit to Brian Shouse, who is our pitching coach in the Arizona League and pitched a number of years in the major leagues. He dropped down Jurado’s slot from a high slot to more of a low three-quarters slot, which he throws now and really helps his fastball move. He gets a ton of ground balls with his sinker. He throws a lot of strikes and mixes in his breaking balls and his changeups very well.

He’s throwing a curveball now, which is another nice toy for him?

Daly: Absolutely, and he has a real good feel. When guys have power – nd he has a fastball that he can run up there over 90 miles an hour – and then he’s able to break out his offspeed pitches, it really puts hitters on their heels. His sinker is obviously his money pitch and when he’s able to throw the other offspeed pitches for strikes, it puts hitters on their heels. We’ve seen that with the performance of Jurado.

Luis Ortiz has had a couple of wrinkles, but numbers wise he has a low ERA, good WHIP, a ton of strikeouts. I know you’re kind of pacing him along, especially with the arm fatigue. What is your evaluation of him at this point?

Daly: We’re really happy with Luis. I think our goal was for him to get out here on opening day and to get through the whole season. A player learns a ton, especially a player coming out of high school, going out for the first time and getting through a full season at a full-season club. We’re really happy with what he’s done throughout the year.

Obviously there’s a little bit of a setback here with the arm fatigue. We’re looking to get him back here probably in about a month or so. But we’re really happy with where Luis is. He’s working on all his pitches. His changeup continues to develop as does the power fastball and a good breaking ball.

Collin Wiles is another guy that has been good night in and night out. I’m honestly a little surprised he’s still here. Let me ask you about his development and where he goes from here.

Daly: We give Collin a ton of credit. He had a very good offseason. I think he really took ownership in his offseason program and really invested in where he was at in his career and it’s paying dividends on the field. He’s able to throw all of his pitches for strikes at anytime in the count. He has an extreme amount of confidence on the mound and that come through.  I think that’s due in large part to the work that he did in the offseason. He came into spring training very, very focused and that’s carried through here in the season.

We have had some conversations about challenging him at the next level, but we’re really happy with where he’s at, how he’s pitching and how he’s performing. With his age, as a high-school player coming out of Kansas City, we still feel that there’s some challenges for him here at the low-A level. But we’re really happy where he’s at.

This is not necessarily about Collin, but just in general. How much does the High Desert situation play into you advancing guys and not wanting to tax them at that spot versus maybe they need that challenge?

Daly: I don’t think it’s so much about High Desert. I think it’s more about the individual player and where he needs to be challenged or where he’s at in his career.

If you look back when Arizona was at High Desert, they sent John Patterson and Brandon Webb and Brad Penny. So there have been pitchers that have been very successful major league pitchers that have gone through High Desert.

But I think our decisions are based more on the individual player and what they need and where we see they’re at in their careers in terms of promoting them or having them go through High Desert or not.

We’ve had some success. Frank Lopez is a guy who pitched here and had some success early on at High Desert and he earned a promotion up to Frisco. There are pitchers that can go out there and have had some success. I think it’s a very good learning experience if you’re able to pitch in High Desert in those type of conditions.

Is there a mental component that plays into that at times, where you might be hesitant to send somebody there because if they get lit up with the easy home run, you worry about the psyche?

Daly: I think that’s part of like each individual guy. I think our coaches have a very good feel for each individual player. We do talk about it amongst our staff, amongst our coaches about what’s best for each individual player. Some guys have gone out there and taken on that challenge and were able to overcome High Desert. That usually bodes pretty well for success at the next level.

Let me ask you about one other guy and that’s Yohander Mendez. He was here and there last year because of the shoulder and other injuries health wise. He had a good year out of the bullpen, but I know the object has always been to get him back into the rotation. You’ve got to be pleased with where he is at this point.

Daly: We’re very happy with Yohander. We had a couple of setbacks with some injuries in his career. I think the goal was to start him out in the pen this year with some short stints to try to keep him healthy. He’s done that and has been able to post every time that we’ve asked him to pitch.

Now, I think, his goal has changed in terms of, can we build strength. He’s done a nice job with Wade Lamont, our strength and conditioning coach, in terms of putting more weight on his body. I know it doesn’t really show, but he’s up to over 200 pounds. That’s a huge credit to Yohander and the tireless efforts of Lamont. Obviously Oscar Marin (Crawdads pitching coach) has done a real nice job with him last year and this year. We’re really happy with where Yohander is at and obviously it’s showing on the field.

Let me go to the hitting side of the team and start with Josh Morgan, who had a rough start getting his feet wet, but the last two months has done well.

Daly: Definitely, he’s certainly found it. He’s one of the guys going through his first full-season year. I think in April the hits weren’t falling, but he continued to have an outstanding makeup. He’s a very, very hard worker. He believes in the talent and we believe in the talent as well. I think that we’ve seen that over the past couple of months with the consistent approach and the consistent work ethic and those hits are falling. Obviously, he’s been a huge part of the 2015 Crawdads.

A guy that has been the glue or spark plug, or whatever cliché you want to use, has been Jose Trevino. I know it’s been his first full year of catching and I know that’s gone well. But all around he’s a guy that keeps the clubhouse together.

Daly: We’re very, very, very happy with Jose Trevino, not only defensively, but offensively. There’s a lot of stuff as a catcher that you need to work on in terms of your own defensive, knowing the pitching staff , being able to help your pitchers get through each count. But then he’s able to step into the box with his bat and be very productive in the middle of the lineup. So, we’re really happy with the things that Jose has accomplished so far both offensively and defensively. You see the makeup and you see how he’s able to keep his focus together.

I’m going to go to Jairo Beras, who had the rough start not running out a batted ball the first night. He had a good couple of weeks here where it seemed like he was seeing everything, but then he gets into another thing last night where he doesn’t run it out. Let me ask you about him and what is a tough situation.

Daly: Jairo is somebody there have been some ups and been some downs. I know last year he had a very good second half here in Hickory. It looked like he was going on that path again here and have another strong second half in 2015.

Part of the process is not about numbers, but part of the process is about playing the game the right way. I think Corey’s done a really good job of handling the situation with Jairo.

We’re still very excited about Jairo and I think he’s still going to be a big part of this Crawdads team over the last couple of months. I think his at bats are getting more consistent. He’s seeing balls batter and he’s using the whole field. He had a nice double down the right field line. He’s walking a little more. I think that there’s some stuff, just with player in development, there’s some ups and some downs, but we’re still very bullish on where Jairo is and his status in the organization.

You mentioned that you’re excited about Jairo and the Rangers are excited about Jairo. Is there a point where Jairo is excited about Jairo and there are not the mental lapses?

Daly: You hope so, yes. I would fully expect that to happen. When that happens, I’m not sure that anybody knows. It’s really up to the player to decide that they’re going to do the things each and every day that’s part of being a professional player. I think it’s really up to Jairo. Our job as an organization is to support him and when he doesn’t do the things that he’s supposed to do to correct them and teach him and to make sure he learns from him. Ultimately, it’s up to Jairo to make those changes.

Michael De Leon. The hitting is still not quite there. He’s still only 18 and the strength is getting there, but defensively, what a wizard.

Daly: With Michael last year, it was really the year of opportunity. When we signed him in 2013, nobody thought that in 2014 that he would play the majority of his games in Hickory. None of our guys that we had signed in their first year – Jurickson Profar, Rougned Odor – none of those guys spent any time in Hickory. There was an opportunity last year with the number of injuries. To his credit, he took advantage.

I think there are still challenges for Michael here at this level, but he’s done an outstanding job. When he can play defense like he can play defense at shortstop, he’s always going to have the opportunity to play. The manager is going to want to get you in the lineup based on the defense that he provides.

He hits at the top of the lineup and makes a ton of contact. He’s going to get bigger and stronger. I know that Wade Lamont is working with him relentless to try to get him faster and try to get him bigger and stronger. But, when you have a shortstop that can play that type of defense, the pitchers really appreciate you, and the manager’s always going to find a way to get you into the lineup. That’s his calling card is his defense right now.

Let me ask you about one more guy and that’s Tendler. He had a hot start and then went into the slump, but you get the feeling that he’s coming out of some things.

Daly: I give Luke a ton of credit. Luke came into the organization last year and right away has been all about baseball. After Spokane – he had a real nice year there – he spent the winter in Columbia. He went down there on his own and went to the Columbian Winter League. The first time we’ve ever had a player right out of the draft make the decision on his own to go down to Colombia. So, he really invested in his career. He really wants to be as good as he can.

I know that he came into Hickory this year and was on fire in April and in May. He was producing maybe better than he thought that he was. Right now in the slump, he’s better than he’s showing now.

We’re really happy with Luke. Once again, a guy going through his first full season and it’s hard. A hundred-and-forty games is a long season; it’s a grind. He’s done a real nice job. He’s a big part of the Crawdads team. I know that Corey has a lot of confidence in him and we’re going to continue to run him out there and he’s going to figure it out and be a big part of the team here.

Who has surprised you that maybe you didn’t expect to put together the season they have?

I think like the back end of the bullpen was really good. Parks and Fasola, both of those guys, especially Fasola, coming in and closing the door and saving a lot of games. I know that Corey had a ton of confidence looking down there in the eighth or ninth inning and bring in big John to close out the game.

Obviously, John pitched very well and earned himself a promotion up to High Desert. So, I think John Fasola coming in and taking the reins of the closer role and earning a promotion was the biggest surprise here so far.

(Eduard) Pinto?:

Daly: Been good. He can always hit. He hit close to .400 in the Dominican Summer League his first summer out. I think his big key is staying healthy. That’s something he continues to manage each and every day. He can hit, but his ability to on the field is the key.

Game Story: Savannah at Hickory June 13

What Happened?:

See my article from the Hickory Daily Record website: Hickory edges Savannah 3-2

The Good:

**Adam Parks: He and his slider own Savannah in 2015. In 6.1 innings against the Sand Gnats in 2015, the Easton, Md. native has 15 Ks and allowed five hits and a walk. By my count, he had 10 missed bats, all on sliders. His strikeout of Luis Guillorme in the fourth kept the score tied, but for me the seventh innings felt like the ballgame.

In the opening game of the series, Savannah answered at the plate one half-inning after all four innings that Hickory scored. The Sand Gnats did so again in the second after the Crawdads broke open the scoring in the first. When the Crawdads took the lead in the sixth, Savannah sent up the top of the order, which included Hickory’s nemesis Jonathan Johnson- who has reached base seven of ten times in the series. Johnson walked to lead off the inning and went to second on a wild pitch. After fouling back two straight 1-2 pitches, Guillorme again struck out against Parks, who then finished off the inning by fanning Wuilmer Becerra and Jon Leroux.

**John Fasola: He completed the final two innings by allowing just a bloop single to pinch-hitter Eudor Garcia. Fasola then picked off the pinch-runner Patrick Biondi before ending the night by getting Johnson to fly out. He’s been working on a change and tonight he picked at least four outs with it (one a fastball, the other may’ve been a slider).

**Jose Trevino: Now with eight RBI during the home stand. Sat dead red on a first-pitch fastball and lined it straight up the middle for what turned out to be the decisive run of the game.

With Alfaro likely out for the year, I can’t help but wonder if Deglan gets a sink-or-swim assignment at Frisco and Trevino follows on the Rangers catching train to High Desert if and when Hickory clinches a playoff spot. It’s his first full season as a full-time catcher (he’s relatively new to the position after playing mostly shortstop at Oral Roberts.)

**Isiah Kiner-Falefa: Made a brilliant stop of Vicente Lupo’s sharp grounder in the ninth. Moving quickly to his left, Kiner-Falefa slid to a quick stop to catch the quick hop, then fired to first to catch the speedy runner. The errant throw aside on a potential double play ball in the fourth, his play at third has been steady. He makes the routine plays with an occasional flash added now and then.

**Luke Tedler: In talking with Rangers minor league hitting coordinator Josue Perez (interview to be posted soon), he mentioned that Tendler has been going back to basics in relearning to get ready for the fastball. After a big swing-and-miss on a slider, Tendler took a slider off the plate and then punished a “hit-me” fastball up the middle. He lined another fastball hard to left in the sixth.

**Eduardo Pinto: Appears to be seeing the ball well at the plate. He earned his 13th walk of the season, seven of those have now come in the last five games. Swung at only two pitches all night, one was a sharp grounder that turned into a double play in the first. The other was a fastball that was rocketed off the wall in RCF for a triple.

The Not-So-Good:

**Brett Martin had poor command of his fastball (90-92, T-95) all night and never really developed a flow or consistent feel for the strike zone overall. Martin needed 69 pitches (39 strikes) to get 10 outs. Has yet to get back into a groove since missing a recent start with a back ailment.

The Opposition:

**Luis Guillorme: There’s a really good group of defensive shortstops in this league (Michael De Leon of Hickory, Ozhaino Albies of Rome, Cole Tucker of West Virginia to name a few). Guillorme is certainly worth watching in the field. In the first, Eduard Pinto smashed a grounder to 1B Adrian Abreu, who made the pick and started the double play. The throw short hopped Guillorme as he crossed the 2B bag. He made the grab of the short hop, quickly made the transfer to the throwing hand and gunned to the first and hit the pitcher Corey Oswalt covering the bag.

**Patrick Biondi: He had one job—stay on base. With the SAL’s leading hitter (Johnson) at the plate, Biondi, who had entered the game as the tying run at first, got picked off before a throw was made home.

Learning to Provide Relief: An Interview with Adam Parks

Numbers don’t always tell the story of what a pitcher can do in the long term. When looking solely at the numbers of current Crawdads relief pitcher Adam Parks in college, one would think a pro career for him would be a stretch.

Named an all-state performer in 2010 and 2011, the native of Easton, Md. was a member of St. Michaels High’s state title team during three of his four prep seasons. Two summers ago, Parks threw a seven-inning perfect game while with Charles Town (WV) of the collegiate Valley League.

However, his college career on paper at Liberty (VA) University was somewhat underwhelming.  He posted an 8.33 ERA in 27 innings with 20 strikeouts and 19 walks combined during his redshirt-freshman and sophomore years. That came after a year away from the mound due to “Tommy John” surgery.

He offers a 92-94 mph fastball, but it’s his wipeout slider that caught the attention of Rangers amateur scout Jonathan George, who convinced the club to draft Parks in the 33rd round last June.

So far in the successive 12 months since his selection, Parks has rewarded the Rangers’ interest in him. Last summer at short-season Spokane, he allowed just six earned runs in 25.1 innings (2.13 ERA) with 31 Ks and only five walks over 18 relief outings.

This year, he’s been one of the Crawdads most reliable “bridge” relievers, putting up a 2.93 ERA (10 earned runs in 30.2 inning) as a reliever with 44 Ks and eight walks. In his last relief outing on May 26, (he made his first pro start on Saturday, May 30) Parks struck out seven in 3.2 innings to defeat Delmarva. It was the seventh time in 11 relief outings that Parks has fanned at least five in three or more innings.

Reliever Adam Parks delivers a pitch in a game against Delmarva on May 26 (Photo courtesy of Tracy Proffitt)

Reliever Adam Parks delivers a pitch in a game against Delmarva on May 26 (Photo courtesy of Tracy Proffitt)

I talked with Parks after the relief outing against Delmarva about his season so far, the adjustment to the bullpen, and the development of new pitches to his arsenal.

 

From what I’ve seen this season number wise, you’ve been a big strikeout guy. Is that what you’ve been known for?

Parks: Last year in Spokane, I always seemed to get a strikeout an inning. Being with the Rangers, they’ve really helped me develop my fastball command and my slider. Now, it’s been adding a changeup and now a curveball, so it’s easier to set up hitters. As you can see, I usually put people away with my slider or a located fastball.

What’s been the key to developing those pitches that you’ve had, as well as the new ones you’re working on?

Parks: In Spokane, I worked with my pitching coach a lot in standing tall and working on different pitching mechanics. Especially here, when I got to Hickory, Oscar’s (pitching coach Oscan Marin) been working with me with my direction, which has really helped me with my pitch location. It’s helped me with my slider and it’s helping me to locate my slider better to lefties and righties. The pitching staff of the Texas Rangers has been the best for me.

What was the biggest pitch that you had to develop this year to be able to step up to another level?

Parks: I had to get more consistent with my changeup and in the offseason I worked on a curveball, so I can have a four-pitch mix, instead of just a two-pitch. Last year in Spokane, I was a closer. Now, I’m more of a long relief, throwing multiple innings. So having four pitches instead of two is more beneficial. Plus having changeups, it’s key to pitching.

What type of change are you throwing?

Parks: I don’t even know how to explain it. It’s just a two-seam changeup. I just put my fingers on it and let it rip.

Long term, staying in the bullpen, is that where you think you’re career will go at this point?

Parks: I don’t know, it’s hard to tell. I enjoy the bullpen, so I will not be upset if I stay in the bullpen,

Do you think you have more of a mentality for that role rather than as a starter?

Parks: Yes and no. Last year in Spokane was my first full year in the bullpen and I learned to love it and I learned that mentality. But, I have had a routine and I like to have a routine. I love being in those tight situations and I love being called on. I would say yes and no.

At the end of the year, what does a successful year look like for you?

Parks: Just knowing that I got better every day, because I’m still developing as a pitcher every day. As long as I can tell that I got better. Numbers are great, ERA’s great and all this, but as long as I’m developing the way the Rangers want me to, I’d say that’s a successful year.

You had a big game on Tuesday, where you struck out seven in 3 2/3 innings during a tight ballgame. You had another game – the 17-inning game comes to mind – when you struck out a bunch of guys in a short span. Do you look more to the strikeout in tight situations?

Parks: If I get a hitter 0-2 or 1-2, I’m looking to strike him out. In tight games, the last thing you want to do is to give in, because one swing of the bat can dictate the game. I would say throwing my pitches with conviction, knowing what strengths are and knowing how I get outs.

When you come into a situation with runners in scoring position, you’ll do anything not to let those runs score, especially if it’s the starter’s runs. The last thing I want to do is to give up the previous pitcher’s runs. So, yeah, strikeouts can get you out of jams.

If there’s a runner and second and third and they hit the ball to second base, a run scores. So I would say you want to come and punch somebody out in those tight situations.

You use your slider for a strikeout, but do you have a go-to pitch for when you need a ground ball or trying to get a double play?

Honestly, I haven’t had many double plays in my career – maybe two or three in my entire career, which hasn’t a long career. I pitched all last year at Spokane and I don’t think I had a double play once.

I know if I need a strike I can go to my fastball. When I’m looking to put somebody away, I usually use a slider.